Not In My Name, Or In The Name Of My Party

This week’s Courier Herald column:

I will not be voting for Donald Trump Tuesday. I do have a person for which I will be able to cast an enthusiastic vote. This column isn’t about him, nor to try to persuade you to vote for or like him. We have far more pressing issues, and there are things that must be said.

In 1992, Georgia’s GOP blocked former leader of the KKK David Duke from appearing as a Republican candidate for President. Then party chairman Alec Poitevant said “David Duke is not a Republican. He is not part of our process. He’s a fringe candidate. He’s a Nazi. We deplore his twisted mentality.”

This is once where our state and my party stood. The lines were clear. And we have prospered because of it.

Georgia has a unique place among the history of the civil rights movement. Our capital Atlanta, once burned to the ground during the Civil War, branded itself in the 1960’s as the “City too busy to hate”. City leaders understood that a great future meant departing from the past. We’re quite fortunate they settled on that instead of “Make Atlanta Great Again”.

The movement went far beyond a brand. We created a real opportunity for an African American middle class and additional ladders to true prosperity. Goals of black and white united in the search of green. Atlanta thrived well beyond its borders.

By comparison, Georgia had but a few hundred thousand more people than neighboring Alabama in 1960. Today the Metro Atlanta area is larger than the entire population of our neighbor to the west, and Georgia as a whole is more than double in size. Working together to solve problems of deep division has served us well.

Today our brand is at risk. Georgia Republicans will get to decide if we’re still willing to demonstrate we’ll work with those of us who may be different for the good of an entire state, or if we will align with someone who seems to have just discovered some of our values very recently while demonstrating a complete disdain for many things we should hold dear.

During the course of this campaign Donald Trump has advocated for positions that would eviscerate our Constitution. He’s no fan of the first amendment, whether for freedom of the press or for freedom of religion. …That would be freedom of all religions, not just the ones that read from Two Corinthians.

He’s a man that is willing to call all citizens of our neighbor to the south “rapists” and block all Muslims from traveling to our country, but on the Sunday before Super Tuesday wanted to be careful not to judge all members of the KKK or their leaders too harshly. I’m sure those that are endorsing Trump must be proud to know that almost a half a century beyond the life of Martin Luther King we have a would be President who wants to make sure the Klan gets a fair hearing.

Donald Trump favors a strong central government. So strong, in fact, that he praises Vladimir Putin and has in the past hailed the success of the Chinese Government in demonstrating strength when they put down the student rebellion at Tiananmen Square.

It shocks me to hear those that would apologize for him compare this man to Ronald Reagan. Ronald Reagan understood the power in having Michael Gorbachev tear down the Berlin Wall. Donald Trump has unlocked the power of those who think that Mexico will build a wall for our amusement.

Donald Trump understands the value of a brand. He has an ongoing dispute with Forbes and others over his valuation of his name. It is a name that he sells in licensing deals. Many of those have failed.

Some, such as Trump University, are the subject of litigation with claims that he abused the hope of Americans down on their luck that wanted to learn a better path to the American dream. What they got instead was a lesson on reading the fine print.

There is no fine print in this campaign. Donald Trump isn’t offering Americans a written contract. He’s asking a country to take his erratic word on faith. It is equally saddening and disturbing that so many Americans are so frustrated with our system that the empty promises from a man with Donald Trump’s personal and professional record would be considered a path to national greatness.

Ronald Reagan once joked that politics was the world’s second oldest profession and it bore a striking resemblance to the first. The oldest joke about the oldest profession is one where a man asks a woman if she’ll sleep with him for a million dollars. She says yes. He then asks how about one hundred dollars? She asks “what kind of a girl do you think I am?” He replies “we’ve already established that. Now we’re just negotiating the price.”

Donald Trump is negotiating a price for our party, and our country. I’ve spent the last decade of my political life arguing with folks who have claimed they wouldn’t budge their positions because of “principle”. Many of them are now willing to back a man who believes every thing is negotiable, and every one has a price.

I choose not to be one of them. I see too much value in the brand of my state and my country to sell for what he is offering. Georgia and America are great. We don’t need Donald Trump to leave us holding the bag after this political licensing deal runs its course. And voters should tell him so on Tuesday.

38
Leave a Reply

Please Login to comment
16 Comment threads
22 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
22 Comment authors
chrisishardcoreCharlieBerthachefdavidFreeDuck Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
gcp
gcp

Trumpet has a Ph.D. from Trump University.

Calypso
Calypso

PiledH.igher&D.eeper?

Calypso
Calypso

Thanks for this, Charlie.

John Konop
John Konop

Charlie,

If it is Trump vs Hillary what will you do?

Benevolus
Benevolus

I will jump in to say that if it is Trump vs. Hillary it is pretty much guaranteed there will be at least 1 independent candidate. Not sure who that might be though. Maybe Howard Dean!

Davo65
Davo65

No way….It will be Trump v Clinton and a sizable number of republicans are going to sit this one out. Clinton wins easily.

Noway2016
Noway2016

They may, indeed, sit it out. They could be replaced by huge numbers of Joe Six Pack Dems.

Bart
Bart

Trump v HRC – The GOP will put forth another candidate, maybe 2 time loser and originator of ObamaRobertsCare Mitt Romney. That would be about right for the ‘conservative’ GOP.

Benevolus
Benevolus

Hard for me to see the GOP put up another GOP candidate besides the nominee, but somebody like Bloomberg might read this as an opportunity.

Bertha
Bertha

Charlie,

Same question – between Trump and Hillary, who do you vote for? Do you sit it out? Does a Trump nomination cause you scale back on party activity?

davidmac
davidmac

Charlie,
Thank you for being a voice of sanity. You join the long list of current Republican officeholders who’ve publicly stood against Trump.
Luminaries like Sen. Ben Sasse, R-NE, and… wait. That’s not a long list at all. Seriously Republican elected officials, if you don’t want your party destroyed by Trump, it’s time to take a stand. Wednesday is too late.

Pete Gibbons
Pete Gibbons

The fact that we have 319 million people in this country and this is what we have to choose from should show how damaged our political system is.

Saltycracker
Saltycracker

I watched The FOX interviews with The top GOP candidates yesterday. It was a media entertainment circus where the candidates must run a gauntlet of minions.

I will hang with Rubio and if we get left with Trump vs. Clinton, I will join the mob likely but the least likely to limit my pursuit of individual happiness, Trump.

George Chidi
George Chidi

Well done. I am at a point where I’m wondering if we really do deserve better than this. Our politics are what we, the people, have made them. We vacillate between outrage and indifference. Half of America cannot be bothered to cast a ballot. We hold the yeoman’s work of governance in disdain. We worry more about which political box an idea can be placed in, or who to blame for its effects, than whether it’s a good idea or not. No one seems willing to look the voters in the eye and tell them to get to work building… Read more »

Saltycracker
Saltycracker

G,
Well said. This is about the concerned being confused and compromised.

IMO, Locally we might be ok with states in league with common cause but not with Federal control via funding or casinos but not another funding source for the edu-cracy or abortion for causes other than birth control for the unwanted.

Benevolus
Benevolus

So one could make the case that maybe you have to break it before it could be fixed. But will we really learn the lesson? (OK, there’s a slim chance that a President Trump wouldn’t be a disaster, but it seems unlikely.) In other words, could G.W. Bush win again? I think by most objective accounts that was an unmitigated fiasco, and yet I think there is a significant support for him still (especially in S. Carolina apparently!) Did we learn anything from that? Is this a different lesson? Does it only get worse? For example, from my perspective, I’m… Read more »

TheManUndertheBridge
TheManUndertheBridge

Let me reiterate, again, this election cycle is not about a carefully crafted and reasonable statement of compelling logic. We are seeing raw, visceral emotion winning, across ALL demographics. In DeKalb, and all over this great Nation we see political candidates tapping into the fear, uncertainty, and doubt that is fanned by 24 hour ‘news’ cycles, purposefully devoid of objective and factual information, and all skewed to a particular bias. Mr. Chidi’s correct and sad description of the average citizen adds credibility that those that do care, research their vote, and actually have a clue as to what is going… Read more »

FreeDuck
FreeDuck

When I hear people say Trump would get things done, I wonder how exactly they think he will do that. By making deals with Congress? Buying votes? He would be every bit as constitutionally restricted as Obama is now.

What I think it hints at is a willingness, and a contradictory one coming from the party who is constantly talking about the Constitution, to do away with the separation powers. As long as that power can be concentrated in someone they believe in. Hopefully I don’t have to say why that’s a bad idea.

Doug Deal
Doug Deal

I have been Trump’s harshest critic and have been a Kasich supporter since the beginning and at one point Rubio was my second choice. Now, the disingenuous nonsense from you and others as you really around Rubio is laughable. If Trump was so much the Nazi KKK Stalin Hilter Ghengis Khan Devil Satin at a point designed to help Rubio’s failing campaign, he was the same person a few months ago when the party had him pledge that he would not bolt it. Trump is a bad candidate, but that is all the Republican party does is push bad candidates.… Read more »

Doug Deal
Doug Deal

Yes it’s long. Grow up.

TheManUndertheBridge
TheManUndertheBridge

Do you think Trump would ask, and Kasich might consider, a Veep? I will pull the lever for Kasich tomorrow, and if nominated for Trump in November.

If Trump has to actually debate Hillary it may be the ugliest display on public TV ever, or the biggest smack down since Tyson had an Earwich.

Ellynn
Ellynn

Schumer… Reid is retiring.

Baker
Baker

The “establishment”, whatever that means, does what it does largely to try and make sure the guy that is most electable wins the primary. Some significant amount of voters does the same thing. Romney wasn’t handed the nomination by Mitch McConnell. A large enough share of voters thought he had a better chance of winning a general election than Bachmann, Cain, Santorum, Newt, Ron Paul, Huntsman, Rick Perry, probably some other people. Who exactly do you think had a better chance than the guy the oh-so-evil establishment wanted? And who exactly were the “very good candidates” flushed from the race… Read more »

Saltycracker
Saltycracker

Any candidate out there fighting to put in processes that crush the mismanagement, corruption and fraud in our systems or change what is unmanageable ? Nah, that might restore some sense when we believe selective enforcement will bypass us.

xdog
xdog

A lot of y’all seem to be going through every stage of grief at the same time. You’re all falling apart over the dire moment the gop finds itself in. You’re worried about country, party, brand, place at the trough. You should all toughen up. In truth, the great majority of you will be pulling the R lever in November whether the candidate is Trump, one of the Cubanos, or Ted Nugent. If you win, the country will manage to lurch through the next four years, although maybe not in your preferred direction. If you lose, you can hold another… Read more »

Jack Fitz
Jack Fitz

Don’t forget cries of fiscal responsibility only to promote tax plans that add TRILLIONS to the national debt they’re so concerned with addressing. (mainly as a talking point)

http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/no-one-can-agree-how-much-the-presidential-candidates-tax-plans-will-cost/

Benevolus
Benevolus

“If you win, the country will manage to lurch through the next four years,” This is the part that scares me. Whether it’s Trump or Cruz we will almost certainly go to war with somebody. Hopefully not Russia but who knows. Maybe just another nation building exercise in Iraq with a few thousand sons and daughters lost. And if we try to do it AGAIN while cutting taxes we’ll really show our inability to learn.

chefdavid
chefdavid

Well it’s going to be Trump vs. Hillary according to this cnn poll. http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2016/images/02/28/rel4a.-.2016.primaries.pdf If your not voting for them you might as well stay home Tuesday. Unless there are some local issues of course.

Bart
Bart

I find it laughable that so many are concerned about the GOP reputation as if Trump can tarnish what is left of that reputation. The party has done a fine job of imploding by itself.

Baker
Baker

“I find it laughable that so many are concerned about the GOP reputation as if Trump can tarnish what is left of that reputation. The party has done a fine job of imploding by itself.”

Do you say that because McConnell and crew have compromised too much and are just “Democrat Lite™”? Or because the radical Tea Party types have too much influence? See the problem here?

Bart
Bart

McConnell and crew have done nothing, that’s part of the problem. And the Tea Party has lost considerable influence, check Cruz in the latest GA poll, home of the TPP which endorsed him. Hard to see how they have any effect on even their home state. I point it out because it is true. The GOP on every level is no longer an influential force when it comes to elections due to years of ignoring large portions of the rank and file. Ron Paul tapped into it, Trump drilled down with expert strategy to solidify a large swath of independent… Read more »

Saltycracker
Saltycracker

At least Trump is not telling me what I need to be doing for him or who I owe or even what he is going to give me in return for a vote.

Cause when they do, they become liars.

Benevolus
Benevolus

That’s satire, right?

Saltycracker
Saltycracker

If I didn’t despise the Clintons so much, I’d get a “Don’t blame me, I didn’t vote” button.

Bart
Bart

Latest GA poll results released by Landmark/Rosetta Stone – http://politics.blog.ajc.com/2016/02/29/wsb-poll-hillary-clinton-has-a-47-point-lead-in-georgia/

Trump up to 39%
Rubio steady at 20%
Cruz sliding at 15%

Money quote from John Garst, Rosetta Stone – “Folks – take a look at Real Clear Politics from around the country. This race is over,” he posted on Facebook. “Donald Trump will hit the required number of delegates within the next two weeks and the race will be locked up. I’m not advocating for any candidate here, but it is time to wake up and smell the coffee.”

Tomorrow will be interesting.

Baker
Baker

It may be over…and we will deserve Hillary and everything she brings with her.