Morning Reads for Tuesday, January 12, 2016

Good morning! I hope your eggs were properly cooked, and your issues were equally to your liking.

It’s only Day 2 of session, and by now you may have spent enough time thinking about the Capitol to ponder, “Oh, this is why Daddy said not to go downtown! Teri, remind me what we’re looking for?”

It’s This Week in Hamilton! Over at Vulture, in honor of yesterday’s birthday of our Ten Dollar Founding Father, it’s Hamilton Week. This interview with several of the musical’s stars is delightful, and illustrates how lucky we are to be alive right now, so we can witness extremely intelligent, undeniably talented people sing superbly catchy songs about our nation’s birth (and afterbirth). Gems in the interview include Daveed Diggs, who portrays both Thomas Jefferson and the Marquis de Lafayette, explaining what it actually means to be famous:

There are people who haven’t done anything but who are famous. Like, you can be YouTube famous tomorrow if you have the right cat. Some of my favorite research was reading the letters between Lafayette and George Washington where they’re, like, trading tips about who should build a statue of you.

Finally – why am I here? The short answer is that for the past year, I contributed to a blog along with a group of smart, talented, writers who valued thoughtful analysis of the issues facing Georgia, and – most importantly – brought levity to the conversation, since politics without a little levity is absolutely miserable. I represent Smyrna’s Ward 3, and I appreciate that municipal elections in Georgia are nonpartisan, since the services we provide to residents are fundamental to a primal degree: things like sanitation, water, public safety, and bike sharing. I’ll mostly write here about issues that impact local decision-makers, and since I have two school-aged children, I’ll probably also write about issues that impact The Kids. Thanks for reading, and thanks for contributing to the discussion here. Onward, and Open Thread!

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Rambler14
Rambler14

Final Report from the Casino Committee: https://cmgajcpolitics.files.wordpress.com/2016/01/hope-preservation-report-final-1-11-16.pdf The chairman of the Economic Development Committee’s bill suggests up to six casinos in five regions. It has a companion measure, House Resolution 807, that would ask voters to amend the Constitution to allow casinos. HB 677 would establish the guts of the program. The AJC’s exclusive pre-session poll found that 62 percent of Georgians support legalizing casino gambling. Supporters of the idea on Monday said they would push first on the resolution and save the enabling legislation for 2017. The study committee estimates Georgia is losing up to $346 million a year… Read more »

Benevolus
Benevolus

I still haven’t heard any reason why we would take any risk to allow a pipeline that transports Chinese-owned oil to a port facility. In what way does this help us at all?

The Eiger
The Eiger

That oil is already being moved across our rails and roads. Pipelines are much safer and will help reduce traffic on roads to a small extent but will help reduce traffic on our rail system quite a bit. I have no problem with pipeline as long as the company building the pipeline is offering fair market value for the land they are using. This has not been the case in some locations.

The Eiger
The Eiger

Here is a really good article about the transportation of oil products. It really is a pick your poison scenario. I tend to believe that a well maintained and yes, regulated pipeline is the best option. http://www.forbes.com/sites/jamesconca/2014/04/26/pick-your-poison-for-crude-pipeline-rail-truck-or-boat/ Here are a few key paragraphs. “In the U.S., 70% of crude oil and petroleum products are shipped by pipeline. 23% of oil shipments are on tankers and barges over water. Trucking only accounts for 4% of shipments, and rail for a mere 3%. In Canada, it’s even more lopsided. Almost all (97%) of natural gas and petroleum products are transported by pipelines… Read more »

gcp
gcp

Sorry to hear Atlanta Siverbacks suspended operation because they could not find a new owner. It’s likely any potential new owner was dissuaded because of competition from a Blank owned soccer team that will get a partially taxpayer funded stadium and practice facility. Very difficult to compete with government subsidized monopolies.

Nathan
Nathan

That is disappointing. The Silverbacks are/were a very good team, but I’m not really surprised with the new Atlanta United team coming in to the area. It pretty much sucked the oxygen out of the room for them. Plus, their practice/play fields were right off of Spaghetti Junction, so a new facility probably would have been needed eventually. You’re right, a potential owner probably wouldn’t want to plunk down big dollars for an NASL team to compete with the new MLS team.

http://www.ajc.com/news/sports/pro-sports/silverbacks-cease-operations/np3TW/?icmp=AJC_internallink_01122016_digesttease_0112digest01

Will Durant
Will Durant

Changing the time biannually has become a complete nonsense but this needs to be addressed at the national level. Perhaps Congress could work it in between the bills guaranteed to be vetoed and done only for the opportunity to generate press releases. The energy savings thing is total bunk, even more so with modern lighting. (I calculated my entire Christmas lighting costs in electricity with total LEDs to be less than 50¢. Yes, I’m retired.) Would it be so difficult for offices or schools to change their hours if they feel the need to match the earth’s tilt that even… Read more »

Sally Forth
Sally Forth

Totally with you on this! It makes no sense in today’s society to keep changing clocks twice a year, and struggling with the sleep monster. Not to mention more heart attacks occur on the day we loose that hour than any other day of the year. Besides, the federal provision does not mandate daylight savings time be used. It says that IF any entity decides to use it, they have to conform to a nationwide uniform standard. (Too many different versions were being used, depending on local tee times.) Where do I sign up, what do we do to get… Read more »

Saltycracker
Saltycracker

Coming home from work in the dark is depressing. Save lives and keep the kids in the fields, run with DST year round. If not change std working hours from 9-5 to 8-4.

Sally Forth
Sally Forth

Good point, Salty. I don’t care whether it’s EST or DST year round — they just need to pick a time and stick with it, stop changing twice a year. All the health problems come from those changes’ effects on people’s circadian rhythms. Simply staying one standard time should remedy that. (Besides, I love the temporary extra hour of sleep once I get used to it.)

Will Durant
Will Durant

I don’t care which one we stick with either. It should be up to individual companies or school boards if they wish to change hours due to seasonal changes of available daylight. Most offices and many traditional shift workers have more flexibility than they once did anyway. One of my kids is a nurse who works 3 days a week in a full-time role, one son never sees his kids as a small business owner, and the other one is a pilot and hardly works at all :·) Seriously though the daylight hours worked should not be a federal issue… Read more »

Saltycracker
Saltycracker

Warren Buffett, railroader, don’t want no stinkin pipeline.

Would Hamilton still be a Federalist and opposed the Bill of Rights today with the current Congress and 300 million souls ?

The Orianne Society does good work.

http://www.oriannesociety.org

Will Durant
Will Durant

Since it would be transporting Chinese oil from Canada wouldn’t US companies profit more from rail rather than the pipeline?

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

Re: KeystoneXL lawsuit

I wish TransCanada the best of luck, but the US has a perfect record in NAFTA arbitration cases and I don’t think this is going to be the one to break the streak. With the insanely low cost of oil at present, the Administration’s likely argument of “the environmental concerns outweighed whatever impact the pipeline would have had on oil prices” becomes a lot stronger. WSJ’s suggestion that pointing to the Kenyan pipeline will sway the arbitrators is, pardon the pun, a pipe dream.

auh2o
auh2o

Any chance someone else gets in (Biden) with Hillary’s sinking poll numbers in NH and IA?

Sally Forth
Sally Forth

Hard to say. Anything can, and does, happen in politics.