The Reason Does Not Change the Treason

Boston’s only confederate monument covered after Charlottesville.

This session the Georgia Legislature passed Senate Bill 77, which expands protection of confederate monuments in Georgia.  The bill now gives private groups the right to sue any government or person for removing a monument that “recounts the military service of any past or present military personnel of this state; the United States of America or the several states thereof; or the Confederate States of America or the several states thereof.”

First note, those who voted for this legislation are treasonous by association.  It does not matter if it was your great great grandfather who participated in the civil war.  The Confederate States of America attempted to be a sovereign nation.  Doesn’t matter why because the reason does not change the treason. (That should be the title of a country song.) 

trea·son

/ˈtrēzən/

noun

The crime of betraying one’s country, especially by attempting to kill the sovereign or overthrow the government.

Second note, let’s just think about the fact that in 2019 our state legislators spent valuable time not compensating teachers, not fixing our crumbling infrastructure, not fixing the fact that some rural counties do not have good medical care, but instead focused on re-protecting oversized monuments to the past and creating additional reasons for people to sue other people using the tax dollars that are invested into our courts.

We know why Senators Mullins of Chickamunga, Gooch from Dahlonega, Butch Miller from Gainesville and others felt it necessary to strengthen the already iron proof confederate monument statute.  They did it because they are scared, intimidated, and were raised during an era when American history of the south was still white washed and romanticized.  Time we welcome them to 2019.

Georgians, I know you are frustrated that we are continuing this race to the bottom. But fret not.  The south won’t rise again as long as they are too busy playing pretend.  At some point Georgia will catch up to the rest of America.  When it does the men that led this charge will be on the side of history that most of us scorn, laugh at, and try to forget. 

We may give a pass to those who did it in 1905.   It was a way of life.  Some of can look past those who did it in 1965 when they were caught up in the changes of the Civil Rights Movement.  But those of you who signed on in 2002 during the flag debate and again in 2019 – start creating your apology tour now because the numbers of people still believing in the “Lost Cause” are filling up those cemeteries you are protecting.  As your children and grand-children get older, they are going to wonder why “pop pop” did not just Google the truth before they voted for this legislation. 

But fret not.  This pretty hollow attempt to rewrite history like the daughters of the confederacy did decades ago shows one thing – they are scared.  Back in the day those monuments struck fear in the hearts of blacks in the south.  Now the tables have turned.  They were once intended to remind minorities of the way of life that existed in the south.  They were an attempt to show control.  But the scramble to super-double protect these bronzed extensions to the rural Georgia GOP ego, is tipping their hand. Their innermost fears are being put on display.


But fret not.  This pretty hollow attempt to rewrite history like the daughters of the confederacy did decades ago shows one thing – they are scared. 


This legislation shows they are concerned about the consistent drum beat of the Georgia NAACP, the progress of the other southern states, and the annoying social media post of a few current and former African American elected officials.  The fact that the senators felt a need to strengthen a statute which was already pretty iron clad; shows they know their time in power is coming to an end.  We got Trump because confederate monuments no longer cause fear in southerners. 

Fear has been replaced by embarrassment.  Us southerners whisper loudly to our family from the north, “please just ignore uncle joe in the corner and the confederate flag on his pickup.” The northerner transplants don’t even notice these huge wastes of space and taxpayer dollars that were protected by SB77.  These same confederate symbols may as well be a bronzed statute of Wayne Williams or Tyler Perry to all the folks moving here. 

Frankly my friends who hate these monuments, just laugh.  This legislation is a sign that they know they are losing.  Luckily, this legislation as passed does not at all prohibit adding additional monikers, monuments, plaques near these bronzed fairytales. 

Rather than take them down we should raise money to put placards near each one that memorializes researched facts of those being “honored” through the assistance of the Georgia General Assembly.  I for one would be interested in learning the number of Americans each confederate soldier killed, the number of slaves they owned, or the number of half slave children they fathered. 

When we remove the fictional romanticism and add truth let’s see how appealing the confederacy may be.  The law doesn’t say we can’t add true to their lies.

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Gregs
Gregs

Let’s hope legislation like this hastens the end of the GOP confederacy.

Raleigh
Raleigh

Lies and Treason I have heard all this before if fact I’ve been accused of treason simply due to the fact my great, great, great grandfather was drafted into the confederate army. In the south it wasn’t like the north where you could payoff people to get out of serving. Did he own slaves well no he didn’t just like a great many confederate soldiers but you knew this already and it didn’t fit your invented narrative. Be careful ascribing to the sins of the father rule because there is always something with everyone’s past ancestors that will come back… Read more »

Benevolus
Benevolus

I think what she is saying is that regardless of whatever compelled your great-great grandfather to fight, doesn’t mean you have to continue to support that cause. That was then, this is now. Taking down monuments that serve to honor Confederates is not erasing history. I don’t think anyone is talking about banning books or avoiding the subject in curricula. It’s about presenting a fuller picture of the history, warts and all. And just give it up about the present-day slave trade please? Just because every single person doesn’t publicly express “outrage” over every single social ill on the planet… Read more »

Raleigh
Raleigh

Benevolus, she meant it exactly as she wrote it. I don’t support Slavery in any form and I fully believe slavery is a sin. As I believe Lincoln came to understand as stated in his 2nd inaugural speech. Now if anyone is going to claim outrage about something that happened over 160 years ago with people who are long dead and not have more outrage about what is happening today, they are a hypocrite. Period.

I’m not saying she isn’t outraged but I’ve never seen or read anything from her on the modern slavery subject.

Gregs
Gregs

I never seen you post anything about the plight of Monarch butterflies, so this must mean….

Raleigh
Raleigh

I got several in the grill of my oversized SUV, want some?

Grindelwald
Grindelwald

Georgia was the state that sealed the ratification by becoming the last state needed to make the 3/4th majority for ratification on December 6, 1865. A bit of Irony there. Congress required former Confederate states to ratify the 13th Amendment as a condition to regaining federal representation. Georgia didn’t ratify the 13th or 14th Amendments because they agreed with them. In fact, Georgia spent the next 100+ years actively undermining these Amendments. So there isn’t any irony. I’ve got ancestors who fought for the Confederacy. I’ve got ancestors who took Yankee bullets in the name of the Confederacy. I’ve got… Read more »

chefdavid
chefdavid

Black Codes and Jim Crow laws

What party was responsible for those? The special on PBS on reconstruction is very enlightening.

Should we tear down all the Desoto, Columbus monuments because they don’t fit our standards today? Next thing you know it will be like ISIS in the middle east destroying all kinds of monuments that don’t fit their religion.

Benevolus
Benevolus

“Next thing you know…” This discussion is about Confederate monuments. You want to change the subject?
But anyway, I think people are, in some places, replacing Columbus memorials with others.
http://time.com/4968067/indigenous-peoples-day-columbus-day-cities/
What did Columbus do? He didn’t discover ‘America’. He wasn’t even the first European here. He brought disease and slaughter and slavery. He was lost. He tortured people. He will remain in the history books, but any reverence of him needs to be tempered with the rest of the story.

Grindelwald
Grindelwald

As someone of Scandinavian heritage, I’m totally down with the removal of monuments to Columbus.

Raleigh
Raleigh

The civil war was about money period. After the war the economy of the south was totally destroyed. How many of those large plantations existed after the civil war and of the few that did exist after the war who owned those? Texas and Mississippi didn’t ratify the 13th until after its adoption and Mississippi didn’t fully until 2013 and that must have been when Mississippians were allowed to vote again… New Jersey also reject it and ratified after adoption. Georgia was also kicked back out of the union then readmitted in 1870 along with Texas and Mississippi The story… Read more »

Benevolus
Benevolus
  1. I think you’re wrong about Lincoln’s ‘slavery debt’ comments.
  2. Even if you are right, Lincoln wasn’t Jesus. We don’t have to agree with everything he ever said. Just invoking “Lincoln” isn’t a refutation.
  3. Using Lincoln’s words from 160 years ago to support your point today while also criticizing others for focusing on events from 160 years ago is pretty hypocritical.
Raleigh
Raleigh

Benevolus I’ve read both inaugural addresses many times and there was a marked difference between the first and second. Now you have stated not once but twice that I’m wrong about Lincolns 2nd Inaugural address but you have not offered even once what you think it means. Ok let’s hear your thoughts, It is easy to stand on the sidelines and throw rocks, the floor is yours……… Lincoln wasn’t Jesus… we agree on that one. Lincoln was a tyrant. Heck he wasn’t even a Republican. He was a Whig just like his good friend Henry Clay. When the Whig party… Read more »

Benevolus
Benevolus

I have offered what I think. Here is what I wrote on April 5 or 6: I don’t think that means what you think it means. The “bondsman” phrase is saying that it may be God’s will that every drop of blood spilled due to 250 years of slavery be repaid in blood of war. He wasn’t saying it was already paid, and he wasn’t talking about money. And the idea that he wanted both the North and the South to bear responsibility for the war in no way indicates a debt paid in full. Also: “Yet, if God wills… Read more »

Raleigh
Raleigh

“Yet, if God wills that it (the war) continue until all the wealth piled by…” How do you read any of this to mean that by that time Lincoln considered all debts paid? Why do you think Lincoln put the ““Yet, if God wills……” statement in there at all. The Bondsman and lash were how lincoln described paying for the sin of slavery.. That was the whole point of that speech. I never said Lincoln thought is was all about money, I said that. That said tax revenue was on his mind or he would not have offered the consessions… Read more »

Bull Sullivan
Bull Sullivan

“Treason: The crime of betraying one’s country, especially by attempting to kill the sovereign or overthrow the government.” Confederate Governments were guilty of neither definitions of the noun “Treason” cited by the author above. Our Southern Ancestors sought neither to impeach or kill President Lincoln, nor did we seek to overthrow the Federal Republic. They lawfully and Constitutionally sought to sunder the bonds of Union with other Sovereign States whose intractable ignorance of the conditions of Union and whose understanding of comity and harmony as purposed by the Founding Fathers had been corrupted by the terrorism of irrational abolitionists. You… Read more »

Grindelwald
Grindelwald

Our Southern Ancestors sought neither to impeach or kill President Lincoln

See Booth, John Wilkes.

If you can’t even get the most basic facts right, how are we supposed to buy any of the other nonsense you’re peddling. Go back to the Daily Stormer with your revisionist b.s. about how slavery is actually a good thing and Lincoln was really to blame for the Civil War. Seriously, this is the dumbest, most backward thing I’ve ever read on this site and it’s an insult to those of us that are capable of rational thought.

bethebalance
bethebalance

“We will never know when the States of the Confederacy would have implemented programs to educate slaves, to free them from the yoke of slavery, to admit them as full citizens providing them with responsibilities and rights…” Exactly, This is why counterfactual arguments (hypothetical history) don’t hold any substantive water. Because you’ll never know, and you shouldn’t just presume the best would have happened, or did or didn’t happen. But if I pair Bull’s argument about how the sacrifice of the slaves was critical to the present World Order, with Raleigh’s argument about how the debt of slavery was paid… Read more »

Grindelwald
Grindelwald

“We will never know when the States of the Confederacy would have implemented programs to educate slaves, to free them from the yoke of slavery, to admit them as full citizens providing them with responsibilities and rights…” I don’t know, I feel like nearly 100 years of “separate but equal” is a pretty glaring indication Southern states were in no particular rush to recognize Blacks as full citizens. Apartheid didn’t end until 1994, so let’s not pretend the South was going to have some magical great awakening regarding slavery and racism without the Federal government whipping their tail and putting… Read more »

chefdavid
chefdavid

if the Jews had never been enslaved in Egypt

Should we call for the tearing down the pyramids as they are the greatest monument to slaves?

bethebalance
bethebalance

Pretty well-settled that the Jews (or slaves) didn’t build the pyramids. Just the first link on the results: https://www.usnews.com/science/articles/2010/01/12/egypt-new-find-shows-slaves-didnt-build-pyramids But that only shows the complexity of history. And the benefits of research, even if just a Google. But with the Civil War and American slavery clearly being much more recent and still alive in all its reincarnations within modern America, the history is actually not ancient history. It’s living history. But for argument’s sake, let’s assume that it was slave labor that built the pyramids. The decision to leave or demolish the pyramids would be I the hands of the… Read more »

chefdavid
chefdavid

I am sure you meant Senator Mullis not Mullins. This bill also gives more protections to other monuments as well. (B) ‘Monument’ means a monument, plaque, statue, marker, flag, banner, structure name, display, or memorial constructed and located with the intent of being permanently displayed and perpetually maintained that is: (i) Dedicated to a historical entity or historically significant military, religious, civil, civil rights, political, social, or cultural events or series of events; or (ii) Dedicated to, honors, or recounts the military service of any past or present military personnel of this state; the United States of America or the… Read more »