Morning Reads in Numbers — October 23

Happy Monday, everyone! Did you know the slinky was born when a World War 2 naval engineer dropped a torsion spring and watched in awe as it “walked” across a table? The creator’s wife said in a 2001 interview that she knew it would be a success because “children love simple things.”

The News in Numbers

$2 billion – The amount of money reported by Oath, Verizon’s subsidiary company that includes AOL and Yahoo!. Facebook and Google have long dominated digital marketing. Verizon is positioning itself to challenge the digital behemoths through acquisitions and data. Experts agree it’s a long shot.

11 years ago – Tarana Burke created the #MeToo movement that swept across social media last week to give a voice to women — particularly women of color — who survived sexual assault. No, it didn’t start with a celebrity’s tweet. You can read the heartbreaking backstory here.

3,000 employees – “There is no air conditioning in the summer, no heat in the winter.” That describes the working conditions of state employees whose offices are at 2 Peachtree St. The Georgia Building Authority has been pushing for upgrades for years and only recently won the backing of lawmakers.

1994 – The year the United States and North Korea almost went to war. Jimmy Carter, against President Clinton’s wishes, went to North Korea to smooth it over. He succeeded.

$108 million – Dept of Revenue Commissioner Riley has stepped up efforts to block fraudulent tax returns. The results have been worthwhile it appears.

114 million people – Will watch Justin Timberlake perform at the Super Bowl Halftime Show. 14 years ago he and Janet Jackson’s infamous show stirred controversy.

30
Leave a Reply

Please Login to comment
9 Comment threads
21 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
8 Comment authors
ScottNAtlantarickdaychamblee54EllynnWill Durant Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Noway2016
Noway2016

Dow 23,000! Impressive! Thanks, Mr. Prez! Five trillion in new value!

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

Nice to see you finally giving President Obama credit for helping turn the economy around.

evergreentree
evergreentree

Hmmm. Partisan Republicans were much less impressed with Dow Jones going from 7,949 the day that he was elected – and the low of his administration 6,450 – to 19,732 when he left office. Back then that crowd called the stock market and the unemployment numbers what is now referred to as “fake news” and they alleged some conspiracy on the part of the government, the media, the big banks etc. to cook the books. Then the instant Trump gets elected – before he was even inaugurated – those very same numbers became true and legitimate. The truth: Obama inherited… Read more »

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

No one will ever ask Sean Hannity because Sean Hannity is a moron and people with functioning brain cells don’t bother themselves with what a glorified morning drive DJ thinks about substantive policy issues. I would also point out that, even if the stock market was a good measure of economic strength (note: it isn’t), the Trump Administration and the GOP Congress haven’t made any substantive legislative or regulatory changes which would have contributed to this growth. Trump inherited a sustained period of economic growth. It’s a testament to the Obama Administration’s efforts that the economy continues to tick along… Read more »

rickday
rickday

But her emails!

/s

Ellynn
Ellynn
evergreentree
evergreentree

Hmmm … war with North Korea in 1994 BEFORE we made huge cuts to military, exhausted the military’s manpower and resources with over 15 years of quagmire in Afghanistan and Iraq, and NK completed both their nuclear weapons and ICBMs. Don’t get me wrong, I am not a warmonger or anything. Just something interesting to think about.

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

This morning’s reminder that Trump and the GOP’s lone governing principle is a personal animus towards Barack Obama: The Trump Administration is trying to sabotage Obamacare by making it harder to sign up and by cutting nearly all advertising about the upcoming open enrollment period. The result may very well be that 1.1 million fewer folks sign up for marketplace plans, leading to greater instability and higher premiums. Sabotaging the American healthcare system because you’re jealous Obama attained a major legislative accomplishment that’s better than any “plan” you’ve ever cooked up (cough, Paul Ryan and Tom Price, cough) or because… Read more »

evergreentree
evergreentree

I wish the Democrats would end this talking point because they are clearly only talking to themselves. You pretend as if the GOP would have accepted Obamacare – with its massive increase in spending and large expansion of the role of government over the private sector – had it been proposed and enacted by Bill Clinton or Jimmy Carter. They would not have. The GOP even objected to a GOP written and introduced (by Charlie Norwood) patients bill of rights that would have been slightly more regulation of HMOs. The GOP healthcare “agenda” has been the same for going on… Read more »

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

1) You can already buy insurance across state lines, it doesn’t work, hence why insurers don’t bother with offering those policies. 2) The GOP had no problem with a “massive increase in spending and large expansion of the role of government over the private sector” back in 1993 when Hatch, Grassley, and Lugar were pushing the HEART Act. That proposal included an individual mandate, a ban on denying coverage for pre-existing conditions, government-run healthcare marketplaces, baseline standards for benefits, and government vouchers for lower income folks who didn’t qualify for Medicaid. 3) The GOP’s nominee for President in 2016 started… Read more »

evergreentree
evergreentree

1) Never said it was a good idea. Only that it was part of their proposal, along with tort reform (with nothing to make sure that insurance premiums would be reduced as a result, or that HMOs would pass the results of any lowered premiums off to the consumer) and healthcare savings accounts (which pretty much already exist anyway) 2) “The GOP had no problem with a “massive increase in spending and large expansion of the role of government over the private sector” back in 1993 when Hatch, Grassley, and Lugar were pushing the HEART Act.” The GOP proposed that… Read more »

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

2) The GOP proposed it when there were big Democratic majorities and a newly elected President in the 90s, but didn’t do the same thing when there were big Democratic majorities and a newly elected president in 2009 because Mitch McConnell forbade Hatch, Grassley, and the rest of the GOP from participating in the ACA process. I wonder what the difference was between Clinton and Obama? 3) There’s a difference between “the GOP used racial animus towards the country’s first black President as to drive fundraising and turnout among their base” and “all voters are racist.” My qualm is not… Read more »

rickday
rickday

You misspelled RomneyCare™. What was your issue, again?

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

Regarding the North Korea article… the Carter trip worked because a Presidential visit (even one by a former President) made the North Korean regime feel legitimate and respected and, as a result, brought them to the negotiating table. I’m hopeful another visit could spark a similar outcome, however, I worry about the Trump Administration’s ability to maintain whatever gains they achieve from a potential visit by President Carter.

evergreentree
evergreentree

So a rogue, oppressive, totalitarian criminal regime using the threat of nuclear weapons to gain legitimacy and respect from the world’s leading superpower – and therefore the same on the international stage – is a good thing? Especially when you consider that this won’t be a one shot deal. North Korea is going to keep going back to that well so long as there is water in it, and they know it.

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

Getting an agreement in place that imposes limits on nuclear weapons development, allows for inspections, and sets forth clear sanctions for violations is much better than letting North Korea continue its clandestine development of a nuclear weapons program. We may not like the North Korean regime, but the fact we don’t like them doesn’t erase the reality that the regime exists and that they have developed the ability to manufacture nuclear weapons. We can continue to pretend like military action is a feasible option (it isn’t) or we can recognize that the only way to constrain or roll back the… Read more »

evergreentree
evergreentree

Let me just say that you are rar more optimistic concerning our ability to actually influence what goes on in North Korea than I am.

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

There are two consensus opinions in the North Korea expert community: 1) a first-strike offensive by the US would be a disaster; and 2) the North Korean regime would never commit “suicide” by initiating a first-strike against the U.S. or anyone else. Once you realize that nobody is going to fire the first shot, the question becomes: how do you forge a solution that prevents North Korea from initiating a massive arms buildup in East Asia? Once NK has a fully operational nuclear program, Japan and South Korea will want nuclear weapons as well (The US’ THAAD missile defense system… Read more »

evergreentree
evergreentree

1) agreed

2) agreed

So … why send Carter or anyone else to “negotiate with” and legitimatize that rogue regime again?

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

Because you need to get them to the table.

For sanctions to work, you need the P5 (U.S., China, Russia, UK, France) to agree on what those sanctions will be and to agree that none of them will use their veto in the Security Council. For the Iran Deal, the Obama Administration was able to get the P5 on board (as well as Germany and the EU) because the agreement regarding sanctions, inspections, and nuclear development was mutually agreed upon by all the parties. You can’t get mutual agreement without giving NK a seat at the bargaining table.

Will Durant
Will Durant

We don’t have to like them but please remove your focus on all the dog wagging. Saddam Hussein’s regime fit all of your adjectives as well. Our military intervention there did serve to remove a tyrant but he was their tyrant and ultimately posed little to no threat to the average US citizen. What it did do was destabilize the country and region further, exacerbate the Sunni/Shiite turmoil, and therefore fomented the formation of ISIS. This has led to more terrorism that has ultimately had large effect on not only our citizenry but the world’s. Plus the loss of American… Read more »

evergreentree
evergreentree

@Will: Seems to me like you are shadowboxing. I never said go to war against North Korea. Instead, I desire that we try our level best to economically and politically isolate them. Negotiating or even talking with them removes their political isolation, which gives them far more avenues to skirt their economic isolation. Of course, it is impossible to totally isolate North Korea. America has plenty of enemies that willing to maintain relations and perform some trade with them merely to spite the U.S. of A. But that’s no reason to give North Korea what they want. And yes, there… Read more »

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

Gonna chime and correct you again, friend-o. A large scale invasion of North Korea is one of the dumbest things the United States could do. Even without using nuclear weapons, North Korea has the capability to decimate Seoul, a metro area with 51 million people. Not to mention the reaction we would elicit from China, who does not want to see a unified Korean Peninsula and would undoubtedly side with North Korea in the event we fired the first shot. Even with someone like Trump in office (who, for the record, is an absolute moron), I feel confident the U.S.… Read more »

Ellynn
Ellynn

While Georgia wants more concrete for cars…

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/21/style/the-end-of-freeways.html

chamblee54
chamblee54

Sixteen people were killed by police in the United States last week. https://chamblee54.wordpress.com/2017/10/22/killed-by-police-october-22/

Noway2016
rickday
rickday

“the cut dot com” sounds like solid journalism sourcing. I would shudder to see the ‘suggested sites’ generated on your facebook algorithm.

Noway2016
Noway2016

Don’t use any social media. Never have. Never really seen the point of vomiting out personal information. Now, about this toxic masculinity….

ScottNAtlanta
ScottNAtlanta

How much further does BETTY PRICE have to step in it on HIV before we see it acknowledged here. Why are you ignoring a story about a GA Lawmaker thats hitting national publications… SAD!
Will, Ginny, Jessica??? who is going to step up?