Politics Never Sleeps – Open Season on Jon Ossoff

A brief note: As sad I am about the passing of Editor in Chief Jon Richards, I couldn’t add anything worth reading to the eloquent and moving tributes written by so many others. He was a good man, one who I respected and admired, and I will miss him. I am pretty certain, though, that he would not want me or any of the other contributors to let up in covering Georgia’s special grade of political shenanigans. Politics never sleeps. May God keep him close while we carry on.

It’s Open Season on Jon Ossoff, and Judson Hill has fired the latest shot, accusing him of being an “Anti-Gun Liberal™” in a mailer.

There’s also a report out of the Washington Free Beacon that Ossoff may have padded his resume a wee bit: 

After claiming for months he had five years of experience as a congressional national security staffer with top-secret clearance, Georgia Democrat Jon Ossoff has now admitted that he had clearance for just five months.”

AJC Political Insider Greg Bluestein has also posted a timeline showing that Ossoff’s campaign ads may have oversold his qualifications.

What’s clear is that Democrats are almost all behind Ossoff, in terms of national money and celebrity support. He’s been blessed by Congressmen Hank Johnson and John Lewis. The old Clinton adage about “Democrats fall in love, Republicans fall in line,” is proving true in Georgia’s 6th District.

But it IS Georgia’s 6th, a solidly red and reliably Republican District. And while Democrats may be fired up about young star power, it’s a long way from 40% to 50%+1.

 

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David C
David C

I’m not quite sure the point of wearing camo if you’re going to go hunting with a blinding white piece of plastic, but that’s just me. Then again, the Boy Scouts generally taught me you should shoot at what you want to hit and not, you know, the clouds.

Meanwhile: If you’re laundering your oppo research through the Free Beacon, it ain’t that good oppo research.

Teri
Teri

The most annoying part of that kind of hunt is when you miss the duck and your dog pops up and laughs at you.

ScottNAtlanta
ScottNAtlanta

Yeah, Free Beacon…no fake news there. This is the same tired kind of throw it at the wall and hope it sticks type ad. I’m amazed they dont have anything better than this. Of course these type of ads only give him more name recognition and energize democrats that much more to show up…at least thats what the last two polls have insinuated.

GregB
GregB

The AJC timeline strikes me as fairly impressive for a young guy. I mean, he has a lot more political experience than the President.

Then again, I also can’t find any indication that he’s an “anti-gun liberal” who wants to take our guns, so maybe I just don’t read this stuff right.

Dave Bearse
Dave Bearse

“I mean, he has a lot more political experience than the President.” +1

Jim
Jim

As a Democrat who hopes to see the 6th flipped, I welcome the latest negative attack on Jon Ossoff. By insinuating he’s a fraud, Republicans are clearly going straight at what they think is his greatest strength: his integrity. I agree, and I think that any open-minded voter in the 6th who spends a few minutes listening to and observing this young man will feel the same about his perfectly obvious idealism, public-spiritedness, and integrity. Ossoff is the anti-Trump candidate par excellence. I feel comfortable with a future in which Republicans tie their policy aims to Trump-style cynicism and ends-justifies-the-means… Read more »

The Eiger
The Eiger

You just keep on keeping on Jim. That cool-aide rush of an unwinnable campaign will wear off soon enough.

augusta52
augusta52

It does seem to be odd to attack the guy most likely to finish first in Round 1—Ossoff—if you have not assured yourself you will win the second spot (in other words, that you are assured no one else is going to finish second in your place). Seems like the anti-gun attack would be more useful in the all but certain runoff. Addressing earlier points about how the district is “red”, yes it is—no Democrat has carried it in a statewide election since its creation in 2011. But “red” does not in this instance mean hard right. A majority of… Read more »

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

This isn’t going to be a social wedge issues special election (a divergence from similar races where social issues are used to drive GOP turnout). It will be, in large part, a referendum on Trump/Ryan, their failure on healthcare, and whatever tax reform package they roll out. There’s a lot that will happen between now and the summer, so it’s hard to prognosticate now. But track record doesn’t bode well for Trump and Ryan suddenly becoming competent at their respective jobs.

The Eiger
The Eiger

Social issues haven’t been on the top of the list of issues in the 6th since the last redistricting cut Cherokee County out of the district. Tax reform and the overall economy are there biggest concerns. Which is why when Congress passes a tax reform package during the runoff Ossoff will lose by 10 plus points. You are correct to say that there is a lot to happen between now and the Summer.

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

Hence why I thought Mike’s references to Ossoff being “pro-choice, pro-Planned Parenthood” was a strange choice given the realities of the 6th and the current climate.

Looking forward to seeing the ultimate tax reform proposal, I think there’s plenty of space for R-D cooperation provided Ryan learned the lesson of AHCA: the Freedom Caucus is awful and deserves nothing.

The Eiger
The Eiger

I still think/hope that some type of healthcare deal will pass before tax reform. That will make the difficult task of tax reform slightly easier to handle. If they try to repeal the ACA taxes along with overall tax reform I think that dooms the package from the beginning. They still need to address that before tax reform. We will see.

ScottNAtlanta
ScottNAtlanta

The AHCA was nothing but a top ended tax cut hiding in a healthcare cloak. Them not passing it makes tax reform a harder task because they were trying to front load the tax cuts first. That aint happening now, and its hard to sell top end tax cuts with one side of your face and screaming about the deficit (that still doesnt matter IMO) on the other. When you train people to respond certain ways to ideology, its hard to change the response when its not so convenient anymore.

ScottNAtlanta
ScottNAtlanta

People also tend to forget this isnt the same district Newt won. It was redrawn after the 2010 census. Before that it was harder right. I dont remember the particulars but they added more of the Atlanta ‘burbs to the 6th. Tom Price won big because there was never a credible challenger (if there was one at all). This district has over 60,000 healthcare workers and the AHCA would have left 29,300 people with no insurance had it passed. If you think that makes no difference then we shall see, but I think it will. Add to that Club for… Read more »

The Eiger
The Eiger

“AHCA would have left 29,300 people with no insurance had it passed.” You guys will never stop with the outright lies will you. It’s just in your blood to sound like a lying broken record.

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

Outright lies regarding healthcare policy? I do declare!

The Eiger
The Eiger

Don’t have the time to debate you today. All I can say is that if the ACA was so wonderful why are premiums and deductibles still so high? If it was so wonderful why do 1/3 of the counties in US only have one insurance provider? These are real facts. Your answer cannot include “it’s the republicans fault.” The ACA was suppose to address all these problems, but in reality is has only made the problem worse. You can accuse me of not knowing anything about health policy (which is pretty freaking amusing) but you cannot show anyone where the… Read more »

Benevolus
Benevolus

“helped bring down the costs of healthcare”

How about this:
http://www.factcheck.org/UploadedFiles/2015/02/kff-chart.png

Premium increases are a lot less than they were before ACA.

As far as your other issues:
– Sicker people got insurance early.
– Healthier people continue to (finally) get health insurance.
– As more healthier people get health insurance, costs per capita will go down.
– ACA needs more time to work.

The Eiger
The Eiger

Thanks for posting a link that shows workers earnings are at an all time low under Obama. Some how that is W’s fault. I also love how you all point to a reduction in the increase in premiums as the greatest example of how the ACA worked. We call that a piss poor example. Instead of getting hurt a ton you are saying people are just getting hurt a lot. The cost cure that the Obama administration talked about was a bunch of crap. And both you and GregB continue to repeat the bogus talking points about “bending the cost… Read more »

Benevolus
Benevolus

“Thanks for posting a link that shows workers earnings are at an all time low under Obama”. That’s why I voted for Bernie!

GregB
GregB

1. The cost curve has bent. It’s hard to say how much of the recent decline is due to the ACA and it remains to be seen if healthcare inflation will remain at historically low levels. 2. Real efforts from Congress to improve cost controls would be nice, but of course *someone* hates any possible cost-control measure (insurers, pharma, providers, voters…), so it would require real courage and political capital. Don’t hold your breath for this bunch to conjure up either of those. 3. Premiums have been volatile but they’re still below CBO projections. http://healthaffairs.org/blog/2016/07/21/obamacare-premiums-are-lower-than-you-think/ 4. Complain about high premiums… Read more »

The Eiger
The Eiger

1) The cost curve is a load of crap. 2) Of course it takes courage and the entire freedom caucus should lose there seats over voting against the AHCA. They took the easy way out and had no courage. 3) Again, you and others are still just satisfied with decreasing the large increases by a fraction. That will not fix our long term problems. It’s a talking point and not even a good one. 4) I value logic and will complain about both if I damn well please. They are both problems and the fix isn’t a one or the… Read more »

GregB
GregB

Okay, I don’t know how to respond to “the cost curve is a load of crap.” I’d assumed we were all concerned about the amount of money we spend on healthcare.

AHAC is a good acronym for the AHCA.

I’d love to hear your ideas about further reducing insurance premiums. “AHAC” scored poorly on this measure, and did so only by making it too expensive for old and sick people to purchase health insurance.

You can complain about both all you damn-well please, but you can’t do so logically. You can’t have the Cadillac for the Chevrolet price.

The Eiger
The Eiger

You don’t know how to respond to it because there is no way to respond. The cost curve talking point is a load of crap. Costs are not going down. It’s that simple. They continue to climb just at a fraction of a reduction. That isn’t good enough and not something to be proud of. Clearly, I meant the AHCA. Pope and I’ve been around and around on what the answer is to lowering insurance premiums. Ask him or I’ll try to get back to you later this afternoon. Short answer is the federal government mandating what has to be… Read more »

GregB
GregB

Eiger, short of recessionary periods, prices are going to go up. That being the case, we’d prefer that prices increase slower rather than faster… The ACA doesn’t force anyone to buy a Cadillac. You can buy a Chevy. It will have higher deductibles and a more narrow network, all things being equal… I do think Alexander and Corker’s proposal that Americans in counties with no exchange options would be able to use their ACA subsidy to purchase non-exchange plans has some merit. Something will have to be done to stabilize insurance options in predominately rural markets that have a hard… Read more »

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

Eiger, you’re too rapid fire for me this AM. I never meant to imply you “don’t understand healthcare policy” with my joke yesterday. We come from two different schools of thought and, as a result, are going to have competing theories on how to effectively insure folks and how to pay for it.

GregB, I’m happy to weigh in on this, but I’m absolutely swamped and don’t have time to dedicate for my usual dissertation on health policy.

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

Those 1/3 of counties you reference, by and large, didn’t have ANY insurance prior to ACA because they’re in areas where, because of population, access to medicine, etc., it was prohibitively expensive to offer policies. ACA subsidies guarantee to insurers that the folks in rural Alaska are actually going to be able to afford an insurance policy if its offered (because subsidies are fixed to a set percentage of income, if premiums go up the subsidy goes up). There’s only one insurer in these counties because some dolt named Joe Lieberman killed the public option (see, I’m blaming a Democrat,… Read more »

augusta52
augusta52

“The number of uninsured Americans is at a record low.”

Yeah, no wonder….you have the heavy hand of the IRS snooping into your tax returns, seeing if you have health insurance…when the appropriate answer to that should be “none of your business.” You compel, require, subsidize…why, if this is the greatest thing since sliced bread, you should not have to compel people to join in.

But that is RobertsCare………

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

Carrots and sticks. AHCA penalized the folks for not having insurance, too. However the money from that penalty went to the pockets of insurance companies, not the Treasury Department.

Benevolus
Benevolus

Well we have to pay for EMTALA somehow. Unless you want to repeal it.