State Board of Education Supports Fixing Failing Schools

To the question “Shall the Constitution of Georgia be amended to allow the state to intervene in chronically failing public schools in order to improve student performance?” Georgia’s State Board of Education unanimously says “yes.” Apparently they understand that if it’s broke, you’re supposed to fix it. From the release: 

“The State Board of Education is focused on one thing, and that’s the education of Georgia’s children,” said SBOE Chairman Mike Royal. “The creation of the Opportunity School District will allow the state to rescue children from these chronically failing schools. The status quo clearly isn’t working. It’s time for a change in our education system.”

Keep in mind that there are about 68,000 Georgia students that are trapped in schools that have failed to meet Georgia standards for at least three years. We’ve heard much from local school boards and teacher organizations who think their brand of control is more important than providing those children a quality education. This question will probably be the most debated topic on the ballot this year, unless those opposing the OSD refuse to offer any alternatives to it, and merely continue to whine about local control.

Find out more about the Opportunity School District here. Email any questions you have to [email protected], or put your suggestions in the comments if you prefer. The complete announcement is below the fold. 

State Board of Education backs constitutional amendment

State Board of Education (SBOE) today during a board meeting unanimously passed a formal resolution in support of the Opportunity School District constitutional amendment. 

On the Nov. 8 General Election ballot, Question 1 will read, “Shall the Constitution of Georgia be amended to allow the state to intervene in chronically failing public schools in order to improve student performance?”

“I commend the members of the State Board of Education for their formal resolution in support of the Opportunity School District,” said Deal. “There is a shared mission between the proposed Opportunity School District and the state school board, which is to establish an environment where every public school in Georgia is successful and every child can thrive. Students across our state have been left behind to languish in failing schools for far too long, and I believe Georgia can and must do better. By supporting the Opportunity School District, the State Board of Education is taking a stand against the failing status quo. They are seizing the chance to improve our schools and make our children’s future brighter. By voting “yes” on Question 1 this November, Georgians from every corner of this great state have a chance to do the same.”

The creation of the Opportunity School District would authorize the state to temporarily step in to assist chronically failing public schools and the 68,000 children required by law to attend them. These are schools that have scored an “F” on standardized tests for three or more consecutive years.

“The State Board of Education is focused on one thing, and that’s the education of Georgia’s children,” said SBOE Chairman Mike Royal. “The creation of the Opportunity School District will allow the state to rescue children from these chronically failing schools. The status quo clearly isn’t working. It’s time for a change in our education system.”

The mission of the SBOE, along with the State School Superintendent, is to provide the statewide leadership necessary to ensure opportunities for each public school student be successful.

Gov. Deal sees the Opportunity School District as a strategy to fulfill the goal of the state to provide hope for the families, students, and communities where schools have historically struggled. The Opportunity School District will provide the authority for the state to more effectively provide support and remove barriers to the students’ success. 

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xdogAndrew C. PopeDave BearseBenevolus Recent comment authors
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Benevolus
Benevolus

That’s a very Trumpian point of view. The better bumper sticker slogan is- If it’s broke, let’s break it some more. Because no one really seems to know what this all means. Usually there are all kinds of study committees and academic research (that gets ignored anyway) to try and predict how things would work going forward. For this issue we don’t seem to have much to go on.

Dave Bearse
Dave Bearse

“Apparently they understand that if it’s broke, you’re supposed to fix it.”

No, Board members understand if they don’t approve of an amendment championed by the Governor that appointed them, their service will no longer be needed, as happened to DNR and Department and Community Health Board members.

http://www.myajc.com/news/news/state-regional-govt-politics/deal-drops-two-who-questioned-nursing-home-hike/nhLzX/

http://www.gpb.org/news/2011/12/28/outgoing-board-member-criticizes-deal

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

I haven’t made my mind up on this one, but I want to say that the ballot language is absolute crap.

“in order to improve student performance”

I get that improving student performance is the goal of the new amendment, but there is no guarantee that a state takeover would actually do such a thing. You might as well promise them free ice cream while you’re at it.

xdog
xdog

Dave nailed the rationale behind a lot of support for the amendment. I agree the ballot language is crap but it’s nothing compared to what’s available in the perky animation at Mike’s link where you will learn There’s No Time To Waste to avoid having Our Children Forced To Attend Failing Schools where they will Find Opportunity Closed as they are Trapped In A Cycle Of Poverty. The FAQs are pretty good. I think it’s safe to say that many of the failing schools will be restructured as charter schools. Whether that’s good or bad depends on how you feel… Read more »

Dave Bearse
Dave Bearse

Maybe yes and maybe no as concerns more state money. The amendment authorizes state takeover of the local tax dollars that fund the school. Who do you think is going to win, the state or the local school board, if there’s a dispute about the amount of local taxes the state should control?

It could be a friends and cronies opportunity. The Gov Deal aide most involved with the amendment started collecting paychecks on a non-bid Atlanta schools consulting contract last year, while continuing to consult for Deal.

http://www.ajc.com/news/news/local-education/atlanta-superintendent-defends-hiring-of-former-de/nnrQB/