Cong. Lewis Says Governor Deal in Same League as MLK

Congressman John Lewis heaped tremendous praise on Gov. Nathan Deal for announcing a veto of the controversial RFRA legislation. In fact, Lewis, a lieutenant for Martin Luther King Jr during the Civil Rights Era, said Gov. Deal and other political heavyweights who banded together against HB 757 are following in King’s footsteps.

In a statement released on Monday, Lewis said:

I am relieved that Gov. Deal decided to make it plain that the state of Georgia is also too busy to hate.  There is not any room in our society for laws that open the door to discriminatory behavior…

It says something about the distance we have come and the progress with have made that so many established forces in our community pulled together to stop discrimination from taking hold.  It tells me that the values advanced by Martin Luther King Jr. are still reverberating in our society today, especially in the state where he was born, and in some cases, those values have been embraced as the standard of human decency.

Lewis’ full statement is below.

 

Rep. John Lewis on Decision to Veto Georgia’s Religious Liberty Bill

I am very glad to hear that Governor Nathan Deal decided to veto HB 757, Georgia’s Free Exercise Protection Act, formerly called the Pastor Protection Act. It was the right thing to do. In Atlanta we developed a motto during some of the darkest days of legalized segregation. We decided we were “the city too busy to hate.”

I am relieved that Gov. Deal decided to make it plain that the state of Georgia is also too busy to hate. There is not any room in our society for laws that open the door to discriminatory behavior. Religious freedom is guaranteed and protected by the Constitution, by centuries of legal precedent in America, as well as by the recent decision of the Supreme Court Hobby Lobby v. Burwell.

It was edifying to see powerful forces in our state come together to keep this bill from becoming law. An interreligious coalition of 300 ministers and rabbis protested and declared they did not require the “protection” HB 757 was aimed at providing. Corporations also used their tremendous power to demonstrate their unwillingness to operate in a state that was not inclusive.

It says something about the distance we have come and the progress with have made that so many established forces in our community pulled together to stop discrimination from taking hold. It tells me that the values advanced by Martin Luther King Jr. are still reverberating in our society today, especially in the state where he was born, and in some cases, those values have been embraced as the standard of human decency.

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bethebalanceaugusta52John KonopIndypendantWill Durant Recent comment authors
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Davo65
Davo65

Seriously; if Deal was such moral leader he would have been against this from the very beginning. Instead he kept his finger up to the political wind until he could figure out what decision best suited Nathan Deal.

There’s no courage here….just politics as usual.

Charlie
Charlie

Seriously, in what world of ignorance do you have to live before THIS is your conclusion? The Governor weighed in multiple times on what he expected on his desk if he was to sign it. Here’s one example: http://www.georgiapol.com/2016/03/03/in-opposing-the-current-religious-liberty-bill-governor-deal-turns-to-the-gospel-of-john/ The bill moved on Day 38 of the legislature with little notice to anyone. It was a legislative compromise, not an executive branch’s compromise. And the Governor gave perhaps one of the best press conferences explaining his rationale (completely consistent with his earlier remarks) in a veto, just two business days after the end of the session. The hyper partisans who… Read more »

Davo65
Davo65

Which side is that, Charlie? You seems to know my politics better than I do. Or maybe you just think you do. Deal can quote the bible all he wants and still dance around the fact that his party is full of bigots…as I said before, no courage here.

Charlie
Charlie

I’m just trying to figure out how you expected him to read the mind of the legislature and do something “from the very beginning” different that what he did, which is exactly what he telegraphed at every step of this journey.

Indypendant
Indypendant

I’d expect “something different” much like they telegraphed that there would be no cannabis grows in the state.

Charlie, you’re part of the problem.

John Konop
John Konop

Indy,

I am confused about your point? Why are you upset with Charlie?

Davo65
Davo65

Exactly…on both counts.

bethebalance
bethebalance

I don’t understand the argument either. A generalized brush stroke against a whole group of people (i.e. a whole political party) is its own form of bigotry. Bigotry by a lot of bigots and the bigot-adjacent may have pushed the bill, but the Gov signaled pragmatism the whole way. Pragmatism may not be the shining source of morality, but it does incorporate said moralities into the practical equations. Considering those who pushed the bill thought they were the shining source of morality, the benefits of pragmatism in this case should be acknowledged.

Will Durant
Will Durant

Regardless of the politics the Congressman went a little overboard with the hyperbole.

augusta52
augusta52

Is that the same John Lewis who favors abortion on demand (discrimination?), to the point that Atlanta’s-then Catholic archbishop banned him from speaking at a local church? And the same John Lewis who warned of dogs and fire hoses if Republicans won control of the Fulton County Commission? Just wondering…