11 Worst Bills to Pass in 2016

While expanded medical marijuana legislation that would help thousands of Georgians failed to get a vote in the Senate and little victories like the “brunch bill” died, both chambers spent most of Day 39 & 40 passing bills that will have little to no positive impact on 99% of our lives.

Here’s my list of the most outrageous bills of the 2016 legislative session. Note: This is the short list. There are dozens of dozens more.

  1. HB 798  – Joyce Chandler

This bill allows homeschooling students who meet all the necessary state-mandated requirements to apply for the HOPE scholarship. While this looks like a good idea, the problem lies in that homeschool students, despite meeting all the same standards as public school students, have to score higher on the SAT & ACT in order to qualify. (93rd percentile for homeschool students, 85th percentile for public school students) And the reason? The sponsor said from the floor of the House that she just “came up with the number on her own.)

  1. HB 838 – Shaw Blackmon

Co-sponsored by a representative whose day job is selling insurance, this bill sets a 5% “floor” for Commission rates for certain health insurance policies. Paging Captain Conflict of Interest. (The bill died on the last day in the Senate, but it did pass the House – where the true conflict of interest lies.)

  1. HB 979 – Johnnie Caldwell, Jr.

HB 979 makes it “more illegal” to commit a crime against a person who is a healthcare worker or EMS personnel. With additional fines and criminal punishments, we’re telling the state of Georgia that these people have more value than regular citizens. Like the ridiculousness of “hate crimes,” this does nothing to deter violence. A crime against a person is the same – regardless of the employment status of the victim.

  1. HB 509 – Jesse Petrea

This bill creates an entirely new stem of government thanks to a Republican sponsor and, of course, a Republican majority. HB 509 creates a Georgia Palliative Care and Quality of Life Advisory Council which allows the state to study and assess end of life care measures while working with nursing homes and assisted care facilities – something that is absolutely, definitely NOT the role of the state.

  1. SB 331 – Bruce Thompson

SB 331 has good intentions. The goal of the bill is to prevent rapists from having parental rights should a baby result in “non-consensual” sexual relations.

The problem is that “non-consensual” doesn’t exclusively mean rape in legal terms and the bill doesn’t even call for a conviction of rape…just clear and convincing evidence. What does that even mean?

  1. SB 402 – Jeff Mullis

This bill places a temporary moratorium on narcotic treatment centers in Georgia. New licenses cannot be issued until July 1, 2017. The bill calls for a study of the centers across Georgia and for the Commission to decide whether further legislative action is necessary.

Here’s my question: Under this bill, the number of narcotic treatment centers does not change. If a problem exists, this doesn’t solve it for at least TWO years. One year to study and then another year to pass and implement any changes – something that unscrupulous persons will find a way around anyway.

  1. HB 840 – Ron Stephens

The Georgia legislature took time out of their short 40 day legislative session to redefine the definition of a “feral hog” and then change the wildlife code to require a permit for commercial film purposes that must be obtained by paying an annual fee. Rep. Stephens said the bill was necessary to “honor wildlife” and keep film companies in our state. If that’s true, we don’t need to tack on a fee to entice them to stay.

  1. HB 808 – Wendell Willard – Repealing the Judicial Qualifications Commission

The Judicial Qualifying Commission has long been an oversight committee for judges across the state of Georgia. Unfortunately, it’s also long been victim to grudges in the legal community, and because of such, has been dissolved thanks to the Georgia legislature. The solution is to reinstate a new Commission with new appointees – ones from the Speaker and the Governor – and try to “restore the independence” of the Commission. The problem, though, is that the bill will allow all JQC files and hearings to be closed to the public in an even more private process than before.

The Constitutional Amendment to establish a new form of the JQC will be on the general election ballot in November. I urge you to vote NO.

  1. SB 323Mike Dugan
    This bill will change the law to allow ANY state agency working on an economic development project to keep any and all records pertaining to the project confidential until the

The bill is a slap to the open records process and demonstrates our lawmakers are moving away from transparency, instead of towards it. An amendment that was added in the final days will also allow public colleges’ athletic departments 90 days to respond to open-record requests, when the timeline under the law is a mere 3 days.

  1. SB 369 – Brandon Beach (℅ Jeff Mullis)

In a last ditch attempt to address MARTA following the overwhelming failure early in the session, the initiative was offered a glimmer of hope. In a shameful political move, the Senate stripped a bill originally addressing fireworks and replaced it with MARTA language. That’s right. fireworks to MARTA.
[Similar to the former TSPLOSTs in North Fulton County and South Fulton County as well as the City of Atlanta up to .75% increase  (on the sales tax).]

  1.   HB 757Kevin Tanner

What started as a harmless, do-nothing, feel-good “Pastor Protection Act” quickly spiraled into a discriminatory bill that would allow organizations that receive tax dollars from the state to discriminate against not only same-sex couples, unwed mothers, and divorced parents. Remember the pregnancy resource center bill? Take that one for example: A pro-life, Christian organization that receives grant money funded by our tax dollars can quickly – and without legitimate cause – turn away a pregnant teen by claiming it violates their religious beliefs.

The bill, because of its harmful language, has made for unlikely bedfellows, including the big business Georgia Chamber “establishment” folks who rallied against the bill alongside those in the the limited government liberty movement.

The most unfortunate part of this process, however, has been watching men and women of God claim this discriminatory bill is an act of good faith – of their faith – and has tarnished the open arm picturesque Christian.

Something good that passed but may not see the light of day is the campus carry legislation. Unfortunately, there are concerns that Deal will veto the measure after he raised concerns after the bill’s final passage from both chambers without significant opposition.  

Governor Nathan Deal has until May 3 to decide whether or not he will veto the legislation passed by both Chambers over the last 40 days.  

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The Dixie Cheetomonger
The Dixie Cheetomonger

HB 509 – we just created death panels

Will Durant
Will Durant

This crap is just making it more clear that they shouldn’t meet at all in election years or perhaps only a week limited specifically to the budget.

bgsmallz
bgsmallz

>This will allow for separate TSPLOSTs in North Fulton County and South Fulton County as well as the City of Atlanta up to .75% increase (on the sales tax). This is the same measure that failed in all three areas in 2012.

Well, no. But you’re on a roll…why let facts slow you down.
http://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/real_talk/2012/08/how-tplost-vote-fared-by-region.html

rickday
rickday

Someone help me out here. Is the session allowed to go past midnight? I thought midnight was the drop dead deadline? I watched it live stream for 4 hours to see if 154 and 727 was going to pass. About 9ish, HB-727 (fireworks) was pulled to committee. Some moron added an amendment and it had to be worked out. But that new law will totes screw my competition by closing some loopholes. It APPEARS that the closing gavel was held until 12:30AM for 727 to be introduced, voted and passed. I like the poor senator who had the Granny Crossing… Read more »

Saltycracker
Saltycracker

No bill is considered bad by legislators, lawyers and lobbyists that can keep redefining them year after year. “Non-consensual” “feral””homeschooled percentile””religious belief””economic, aka selective, programs”””Tsplost, aka fireworks””a day without hours”

There is no shame in the career of politics. And folks still won’t go for term limits fearing the bureaucrats ?
Beach only needed one term to prove himself, how did we go downhill from Skip ?

gsupantherfan1
WesleyC
WesleyC

Correct. The senate sat on it on the final day. http://www.legis.ga.gov/legislation/en-US/Display/20152016/HB/838

Dave Bearse
Dave Bearse

10. Is Blackmon among the General Assembly representation that skips out on the continuing education requirements required of everyone else for licensing?

4. The circumstances of the Wilkinson resignation illustrate that Willard thinks General Assembly service is an insiders club. So why shouldn’t the JQC be reconstituted if it’s crossed some of his cronies?

WesleyC
WesleyC

Describing the MARTA for fireworks swap as a “shameful political move” is a little over the top. Bills gets turned into vehicles all the time in the final few days, it’s just part of the process. People’s opinion of that tactic tends to waver depending on their views of the substance of the legislation. For example, the final rape kit bill passed after a similar swap (gun control bill stripped, rape kit language added in its place). Is that equally shameful?

Saltycracker
Saltycracker

“Part of the process” aka normalizing aberrant behavior