Reed Already Doing Damage Control Following Passage of HB 757

Mere hours after the controversial HB 757 was passed, Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed said companies and conventions have expressed reservations about coming to and staying in Atlanta. Also in jeopardy, Reed said, was Atlanta’s bid for the Super Bowl.

A report in The Atlanta Business Chronicle says Reed was “inundated” with phone calls immediately following the bill’s passage:

“I have probably an hour and a half worth of calls to make to convention [organizers] considering pulling out the city,” Reed said Thursday morning. “I’ve got in-person visits with four CEOs in the tech space between now and [next] Wednesday.

“I can’t express the amount of damage being done to Atlanta and Georgia’s reputation as the business and cultural center of the Southeast.”

Lest you think Reed’s fears are isolated or unjustified, nearly every trade group based in Georgia echoed his sentiments.

One bright spot for Reed and his allies is that Governor Deal was not a fan of the earlier version of the bill.

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Will DurantAndrew C. Popeaugusta52Dave Bearsegresham brown Recent comment authors
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John Konop
John Konop

The crazy part is we already saw what happen in Indy! And why the state backed off, and told the McKoon squad in their state, we cannot afford this! Metro Atlanta and Georgia has way more on the line via convention and entertainment business than Indy. READ BELOW: http://www.indystar.com/story/news/politics/2016/01/25/official-rfra-cost-indy-up-12-conventions-and-60m/79328422/ …..The furor surrounding last year’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act might have cost the city of Indianapolis as many as 12 conventions and up to $60 million in economic impact, the city’s nonprofit tourism arm confirmed Monday evening. Though they come with some caveats, the numbers from Visit Indy represent the most… Read more »

Saltycracker
Saltycracker

Does not compute – my questions on the other thread –

augusta52
augusta52

Maybe legislation like this would be less likely if there were less judicial activism in Washington. Like going back to Roe v Wade.

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

Ah, “judicial activism” the buzzword of someone who does not know how our Constitutional system works.

augusta52
augusta52

Oh, I do think I know how the Constitutional system work, thanks you—but it is not former ACLU Counsel Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s version. My version is closer to the recently-departed justice, the successor of whom is of great controversy now.

CoastalCat
CoastalCat

“Judicial activism” = extending rights to people I don’t approve of.

Dave Bearse
Dave Bearse

And placing in the Presidency that candidate that I do.

augusta52
augusta52

Depends what you mean by “rights”, and whether they clearly are in the Constitution, or whether it is interpreted as a “living, breathing” document that “evolves” with the times. That is how we got RobertsCare a few years ago, which I am reminded of at tax season when the IRS has to ask if you have had health insurance, which should not be any of their business. But unfortunately it is because of John Roberts. But I digress…perhaps all those threatening boycotts should be asked what powers faith-based organizations should have. It is not a hypothetical question—the Catholic Church in… Read more »

Dave Bearse
Dave Bearse

We got RobertsCare the same way Hobby Lobby was made a person.

gresham brown
gresham brown

And the people have spoken. Oh. Wait.

CoastalCat
CoastalCat

John Roberts did not give us the ACA. Congress did and they have apparently been unable to muster enough support to reverse their decision.

Faith based organizations should have no secular power. No ability to lobby for laws. No ability to endorse political candidates. They should stick to their faith, to charity, and good works. Otherwise, they are just another business. And should be taxed accordingly.

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

I’m so sick of the ObamaCare was forced on people line. A majority of Americans elected Democratic majorities in the House and Senate. A majority of Americans elected a Democratic President. This was a central point of their platform in 2008, they made it very clear they would push for universal healthcare.

CoastalCat
CoastalCat

Thank you. Universal healthcare is a blessing and a boon to most people. In future years, we will look back on not providing single payer healthcare as a sorry time in our history.

Dave Bearse
Dave Bearse

The GOP was able to fabricate opposition to ObamaCare from discontent with the Great Recession. Opposition is hardly on anyone’s radar, other than those goal from the first year of President Blackenstein was that it fail..

augusta52
augusta52

Yes, and as I recall in 2010, control of Congress flipped from D to R in large part because of Obamacare. So I guess something good did come out of it. Maybe something Obama should have thought about as he laments GOP control of Congress today…….

augusta52
augusta52

No ability to lobby for laws, eh? Well, I guess then Martin Luther King Jr. should have just stuck to his pulpit back in the 1950s and 1960s. No marches or anything like that—sounds like mixing Church and State. And the Catholic bishops—well they just need to suck it up and embrace parts of Obamacare they don’t like. As for endorsements, well yes, IRS regulations don’t allow for that, but it has not always been applied equally—like back in the 1980s, a lot of people criticized the likes of Jerry Falwell for endorsing Reagan, but did not seem to share… Read more »

CoastalCat
CoastalCat

Churches should preach love and tolerance, provide charity and good works. Preachers who endorse candidates are paid shills and should lose any tax benefits.

Marching for social justice and tolerance is protected free speech and exactly what churches should be doing. Lobbying the GA legislative goobers is not.

augusta52
augusta52

Coastal Cat, Jesus did not come to earth to preach tolerance; he came to save us from our sins, paying the ultimate sacrifice at Calvary (as in Good Friday coming up in a few days). As Billy Graham pointed out, God was so intolerant of sin, he sent his Son to die for us. Jesus did not preach “tolerance” when the woman was about to be stoned for adultery; instead he told her to sin no more. Yes, he said we should love all, but that did not mean toleration of sin.

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

But aren’t you looking at the speck in another’s eye? Christ could tell the woman to sin no more because he was, depending upon your persuasion, the Son of God and without sin. As for us mere mortals, I believe the instruction in Matthew was to not judge others, for we are all sinners. So how about we leave the judging up to God and focus on improving ourselves as opposed to telling people who aren’t bothering you and want nothing to do with you how to live their lives.

augusta52
augusta52

Something in your corn flakes this morning? The point is not about judging others; it is about what is the purpose of Christianity. And avoiding sin is a focus. That is why their is personal confession (penance) in the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches; the Catholic and Anglican worship books also feature public confession of sins. a publication from the Eastern Orthodox Church (Antiochian) put it well a few years ago—Church is compared to an ark, which, like a ship, has a destination, the kingdom of heaven. The captain is the Lord, and the disciples (apostles) assist him in leading… Read more »

Will Durant
Will Durant

What Jesus is purported by Augustine to have said to the woman at the well is immaterial. Your religious beliefs are also irrelevant inasmuch as you should have the freedom to act as you desire until that action infringes upon others. At that point, and only at that point do you need a law. Unfortunately not all of our laws meet this criteria but that doesn’t justify creating new ones that are also unnecessary. Individual rights spelled out in the Constitution are those that are there specifically to be protected from the will of the majority. Or to paraphrase Larry… Read more »

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

Government “tells everyone what to do” because we’re all citizens and have consented to be governed.

Christianity shouldn’t tell everyone what to do because not everyone is a Christian. I’m sure Christians wouldn’t be happy if Orthodox Jews started imposing their beliefs on the entirety of society through legislation (say good bye to barbecue, Georgia football, and bacon). Keep prosthletyzing in the private sphere.

John Konop
John Konop

As I said many times , the McKoon squad are doing their best to kill jobs in our state! Looks like no job is safe, unless you are a lawyer like Josh McKoon with RFRA style legislation. ……….Religious liberty’ bill jeopardizes Atlanta Super Bowl bid……… ….If Georgia chooses to turn the “religious liberty” bill into law, be prepared: Atlanta may not get a Super Bowl. That was the suggestion from the NFL on Friday when the league released a statement in response to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s question about whether the league had any position on Georgia House Bill 757. The… Read more »

Saltycracker
Saltycracker

Certainly a hell of a mess. How I see it: The legislators put their ugliest foot forward and after very public wrangling, wringing and washing of hands the damage was done. They then retreated to a reasonable level of staying out of faith based organization’s beliefs but the perception of wrong-ness remains. Now Deal can decide if this is the hill to die on.

Meanwhile a bunch of lobbyists and attorneys made money, the state is embarrassed and the legislators wasted an incredible amount of time when they could have been doing more important things.

augusta52
augusta52

“NFL policies…discrimination based on age, gender…” Really? Hmm, haven’t seen any 90 year-old grandpas playing quarterback, or any women as linebackers. Sounds like discrimination to me… I guess the sports world thinks it has to have a position on every political issue—the Confederate flag, MLK holiday, and now religious liberty. Doubtless if a major abortion bill were coming through, they’d threaten a boycott because so-called “women’s rights” would be at risk. Reminds me of old story, some Hollywood actor asked if he had a position on some issue, may have been the Vietnam War, and he basically said, “I am… Read more »