Congressman Ferguson on Tax Reform Meeting

For the last several months, Congressman Ferguson (GA-03) has been wildly optimistic about tax reform. He is wildly optimistic about a lot of things, really. As a former Congressional staffer, I speak from experience when I say that I know how easy it is to become jaded about the world we are living in. But that is not Drew Ferguson. It’s refreshing to hear him speak, on any given day, on any given subject, about how he sees the world and Washington. It’s refreshing because he has hope. And we all need a little bit of that.

Yesterday, Congressman Ferguson was invited to meet with President Trump to discuss a variety of subjects, but tax reform was a big one. In a press release sent last night, Congressman Ferguson had this to say:

“I was honored to be asked to participate in today’s meeting with the President. We covered a number of important topics, but chief among them was tax reform. The people of the Third District sent me to Washington because I committed to reform our tax code and make America the most competitive place in the world to do business. I was glad to be a part of today’s conversation and offer the conservative voice on this issue. While I agree with the President’s focus on creating jobs and lowering taxes on the middle class, I will continue to fight to lower taxes for every American. The first step is to pass the conservative budget approved by my colleagues and I in the Committee on the Budget.”

I’m dying to know more, to get the details. And I believe those will come in time. I get it. It’s hard to feel optimistic about something as important as tax reform when we have heard it promised over and over again. But I have a good feeling about it these days and I believe that the fact that it is on the table at all is a good sign.

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Andrew C. PopeNoway2016BenevolusDave Bearse Recent comment authors
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Dave Bearse
Dave Bearse

Or course it’s hard to feel optimistic, because after or as part of cutting taxes for the rich which is opposed by a majority of Americans will come the effort to cut services.

Benevolus
Benevolus

There are 19 active aircraft carriers in the world. 11 of them belong to the USA. (The country with the next most is Italy, with 2.)
The US has about 3300 combat aircraft. That’s about the same as Russia and China. Combined.
The US spends about $600 billion on military expenditures per year. That’s more than the next 8 countries combined.

Everybody generally assumes that “tax reform” means “less taxes”. Less taxes means budget cuts. So can the military budget be part of that discussion? Please?

Noway2016
Noway2016

You’re saying that the Russians and the Chinese only have 1 aircraft carrier ? And that the Italians are next on that list with two?? Seriously?

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

China has two, actually. They just launched a new one in April. They have a third, nuclear powered, carrier currently under construction. India has an active carrier and will be launching another next year. Italy just started construction on the Trieste, which will be its 3rd aircraft carrier. Russia has the Admiral Kuznetsov a Soviet-era carrier that was retrofitted in 2015. France has the Charles de Gaulle

The UK is constructing 2 STOVL carriers (short takeoff, vertical landing). Spain currently has a STOVL carrier that Turkey is imitating in construction of its own carrier.

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

While I agree with the President’s focus on creating jobs and lowering taxes on the middle class, I will continue to fight to lower taxes for every American.

In other words, I’m gonna make sure rich people get a nice tax cut as well.

Noway2016
Noway2016

They are part of “every American ” aren’t they? So, sure, they get tax cuts, too.

Andrew C. Pope
Andrew C. Pope

Taxes are 26% of the US GDP, that’s below the OECD average of 34% and only higher than 3 other OECD countries (South Korea, Chile, Mexico). Our taxes per capita are $13,482, that’s 16th out of 29 OECD countries. The notion that Americans are facing a crushing tax burden is, with all due respect, pure poppycock. Pure tax cuts aren’t going to solve this nation’s budgetary issues, particularly when we’re talking about cutting the tax rates for top earners, who are already “undertaxed” compared to their peers in other industrialized countries. The only way to “balance” the budget while simultaneously… Read more »