Rural Broadband service complaints

Not surprisingly the legislature’s study committee on rural broadband is receiving complaints about the lack of quality service throughout the state. After a series of six hearings across the state and thousands of responses to an online survey, the committee has a number of recommendations that could become legislation in the upcoming session.

Maggie Lee of the Macon Telegraph reported:

Some of the suggestions in the committee’s report have to do with making the money side more attractive: the Legislature might consider tax credits or public loans for certain rural broadband builds, for example. The report also suggests reworking some regulations around rights-of-way to lay fiber or getting local permission to do projects.

Recently we spoke with State Sen. Steve Gooch, R-Dahlonega who indicated internet access, slow speeds and high costs were the number one complaint his office receives. Additional 9th District Congressman Doug Collins has led the federal fight to improve service in rural Georgia.

The solution is not expected to be fast or easy but at least the problem is clearly on the state and federal radar.

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MattMD_actual
MattMD_actual

Why has it taken 10 years for this be on the radar in the first place? Some form of residential broadband has been available for nearly two decades!

Satellite “broadband” is a joke, it is not even close to being a viable alternative.

Charlie
Charlie

The broadband you’re discussing today isn’t even close to the internet connection we had 10 years ago, which isn’t the same as 10 years before that. And the problem is, based on the tech presented by some of those who testified before the committee, in ten years, today’s “solution” won’t be what we’re using either. Identifying the problem is easy. (It’s actually four different problems, which I outlined in an earlier column). Solutions are a bit harder. Finding the government role that does more good than harm, even harder. This isn’t a pass the buck kind of situation. There are… Read more »

davidmac
davidmac

And yet, the EPB Gig service in Chattanooga is rated highest in customer satisfaction and has the lowest prices compared to any of the commercial competitors.

So why do Republican-controlled legislatures keep passing bills to prevent municipalities from offering broadband? Seems like that goes against the whole concept of home-rule, and that the “government closest to the people governs best” as well.